Rains from Tropical Storm Joaquin Did Not Stop All Outdoor Activities on East Coast

6 10 2015

Tomb of Unknown Soldier

Fort Bend Ramps Builds Richmond Resident a New Porch and Ramp

3 10 2015

Article about good folks doing good works in Fort Bend County.  This article was written by Katie Stamy, and published in the Fort Bend Herald on September 24, 2015.

Linda Marin, 52, of Fort Bend County suffered from a stroke several years ago, paralyzing her left side and keeping her from doing what she loves most, spending time outdoors. Marin’s stroke left her homebound. The only way she could go anywhere was with the assistance of her husband, Romera Marin.

That was until Saturday when Fort Bend Ramps built Linda a ramp outside of her Richmond home and Pecan Grove residents presented her with a motorized wheelchair. Sixteen volunteers attended to help with the construction on Saturday and were able to rebuild the family’s porch as well as construct a new ramp in eight hours. Shereen Sampson, a Pecan Grove resident heard of Marin’s situation, posted on the Pecan Grove Facebook page, and was able to raise $600 for the woman. With the money raised, the motorized wheelchair was purchased and the remaining $225 was donated to the family.

Fort Bend Ramps

Mike Funderburke with Fort Bend Ramps, Richard Hyde with Fort Bend Ramps, Robert Gully (seated) from Pecan Grove, Mike Speck with Fort Bend Ramps, Lawrence Jackson from with Fort Bend Ramps, Carson Speck with Fort Bend Ramps, Shereen Sampson from Pecan Grove, David Davenport with Fort Bend Ramps, Christie Glaser from Pecan Grove, Walter Armatys with Fort Bend Ramps, Carrie Brown from Pecan Grove, Reesa Ramos from Pecan Grove, Ron Glaser from Pecan Grove, and Randy Shulze, with Fort Bend Ramps, assisted in the building of the new ramp for Linda Marin. Photo by Shereen Sample

According to Sampson, the smile on Linda and her family’s face was the most beautiful gift. “Part of what made this so great for the whole family was that (Romera) was having to bring (Linda) up and down the stairs,” said Sampson. “It got to the point that she didn’t want to leave at all.” Lazarus, the 13-year-old son of Linda and Romero, spent Saturday helping the team build the porch and ramp along side his father and grandfather, said Sampson.

For lunch, residents provided the builders with lunch including burgers, chicken, casseroles and cookies to show their appreciation.
The team began at 7:30 a.m. on Saturday and finished at 4 p.m. “Fort Bend Ramps has it down to a science,” said Sampson in regards to the construction. “It was tremendous to watch them work. They have so many people, they have their own generator, and no mistakes were made.

“They normally just build a ramp but the porch was so unstable that they did that as well.” Carrie Dannemann Brown, Pecan Grove resident, also brought the family lawn chairs to have on their new porch. “(Linda) loves to be outside, that is one thing she talked about many times,” said Sampson. “That’s why this was so needed. She can go outside by herself now.”

“I think a lot of people assume that social workers are able to help every single person in need, but that is not the case,” she added. “I think there are so many other people in need that we need to keep our eyes and ears open for so we can help.”

This Day in Texas Disaster History – September 24th

24 09 2015

Ten years ago, Hurricane Rita crashed ashore in Southeast Texas.  Hitting Texas just three weeks after Hurricane Katrina, many do not remember this storm.  However, it was a big storm which caused immense damage and about 150 deaths.  Here is an article that was published yesterday in the USA Today.  The article was written by Alan Gomez.  As the article notes, many lessons were learned from the disaster.  And the lessons were learned.  The State of Texas and its jurisdictions did indeed learn from Hurricane Rita.  The response to citizens in Texas was much improved three years later when Hurricane Ike hit near Galveston.  Here is the article:

Many who live along the Gulf of Mexico refer to Rita as the “forgotten hurricane.”

Hitting the U.S. just three weeks after Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans, most Americans paid little attention to Rita, which made landfall Sept. 24, 2005, in a far less populated area along the Texas-Louisiana border. Where Katrina left more than 1,800 dead, Rita killed fewer than 150.

But for emergency managers, Rita was almost more important in terms of the lessons learned following the disaster. In the 10 years since Rita struck as a Category 3 hurricane, Texas emergency management officials have redesigned their evacuation plans, local leaders have started building new shelters and Louisiana legislators have updated their antiquated building codes.

“A major lesson? I would say so,” said Ryan Bourriaque, a lifelong resident of Cameron Parish in southwestern Louisiana who now serves as the parish administrator.

The biggest change came in the way large cities evacuate.

As it approached the coast, Rita’s forecast changed daily. The storm was first expected to strike southern Texas, then the massive Houston metropolitan area before actually making landfall close to the Louisiana border. That meant cities from Brownsville to Corpus Christi to Houston were sending their residents fleeing to points further inland, with 3 million people hitting the road at nearly the same time.

That led to agonizing traffic jams where people waited more than a dozen hours to travel just a few miles. Cars that ran out of gas were stranded by the dozens, several died from heat stroke and a van carrying nursing home evacuees exploded, killing 23 patients.

Madhu Beriwal, founder and president of the disaster management consulting firm IEM, said Texas officials were simply not ready for the size of the evacuation. As the storm approached, they ordered phased evacuations to get people out in manageable groups, and they implemented “contra-flow” traffic on highways, meaning all lanes are used to evacuate people in one direction. The problem, Beriwal said, is the state started those plans far too late, leaving a mess on the roads.

“You have to commend them for trying, but there were some problems with trying to do that in the midst of an evacuation,” she said. “It wasn’t successful because that’s a very complicated thing.”

The state responded by preparing plans for future evacuations and, in 2007, creating the Texas Statewide Mutual Aid System to allow local governments to help each other more easily. Now, all cities have evacuation plans and timelines for when to order them. The state has improved its communication with local officials to coordinate the entire system.

Greg Fountain, the emergency management coordinator for Jefferson County, Texas, said that plan includes contracts with fuel distributors and gas stations to ensure that there’s gas available along evacuation routes. He said those new plans were put to the test when Hurricane Ike tore through the same region in 2008. That time, Fountain said traffic moved through the evacuation routes more smoothly and there was plenty of fuel for evacuees.

“Three years later comes Ike and the plans were fantastic,” Fountain said.

Photo: Paul Sancya, AP

Photo: Paul Sancya, AP

Rita also led to other changes throughout the region. Cameron County, Texas, is the southernmost county in the state, but it was in the storm’s path at one point. Given that experience, Tom Hushen, the county emergency management coordinator, said the county began building new, domed shelters to withstand hurricane-force winds.

The county also has contracts with construction firms that can bring heavy equipment, debris-removal operations, companies that provide emergency food and water and others that provide portable bathrooms.

In Louisiana, Rita helped usher in a new era of building codes. Most of the homes in Cameron County, La., a coastal community with just 6,700 people, had been around for generations when the storm tore through. Bourriaque said many of the residents who lost their homes were upset that the Louisiana legislature implemented new building codes that included requirements to elevate homes built in flood zones.

“The feeling was, ‘We’re trying to survive and you’re telling me I can’t build my house back that’s been in the family for six generations?'” he said. “That’s $275,000 for a house that could be built on the ground for $75,000.”

But Bourriaque said Hurricane Ike showed how valuable those new codes were. During Rita, 50% of the county’s homes were destroyed or so badly damaged that they couldn’t be salvaged.

“The homes that were built post-Rita to the elevation standards survived Ike and were minimally impacted,” he said. “Not even losing siding or shingles.”

Despite all the work to improve responses to hurricanes following Rita, Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Craig Fugate said not enough localities have taken heed.

Fugate said FEMA, the National Hurricane Center and the Army Corps of Engineers work together to constantly update risk assessments for every coastal city from Texas to Maine. They run models to show local officials how to organize their evacuations and provide different strategies to conduct them effectively. He said some communities, like those around Norfolk, Va., have worked hard in recent years to update their plans. The rest?

“Some have done more than others,” he said.

Bretagne: The Last Known Living Search and Rescue Dog Who Worked at Ground Zero

20 09 2015

As members of Texas Task Force 1, Bretagne and her mom/handler Denise Corliss had an intense first deployment They joined nearly 100 other search and rescue dogs to find and save people trapped in the rubble of the World Trade Center after 9/11. They’ve had an unshakable bond ever since.

After hearing Bretagne’s story and learning that her 16th birthday was coming up, there was no question in our minds that she deserved a Dog’s Best Day for the ages.

To celebrate her birthday and thank her for her incredible service, we were honored to team up with the dog-lovers at 1 Hotels to bring this New York City hero and her mom back to the city for the ultimate Dog’s Best Day.


Never Forget – 9/11/2001

11 09 2015

World Trade Center Memorial Night_Reuters

Missouri City Opens New Fire Station Tomorrow

30 06 2015

On tomorrow, Wednesday, July 1, 2015, Missouri City Fire Station 5, located at 190 Waters Lake Blvd., will officially open its doors and begin serving the southern portion of Sienna Plantation. Officers and drivers for the new station were sworn in on Thursday, June 25, at a special ceremony at the City Centre at Quail Valley, 2880 La Quinta Dr. A grand opening ceremony for the public is being planned for Saturday, Aug. 15; please watch the City’s website: www.missouricitytx.gov for details.

“The opening of Fire Station 5 has been greatly anticipated by City Council, staff and Sienna residents who will be served by the new station. The hiring of new Fire and Rescue Services staff to man the station and drive fire and rescue vehicles will also alleviate the City’s other fire stations, benefiting residents across all districts,” Missouri City Mayor Allen Owen said. “The new fire station will now open thanks to the agreement the City made with Sienna Plantation Municipal Utility District No. 1 for its funding and future operations.”

Missouri City Fire Station 5The new station is 7,848-square-feet and was designed to add a third bay in the future. The third bay can be used to house an ambulance or other resources depending on the resource needs of the area as the community reaches full build out.

“While the interior of the station provides the same functions as Fire Station 4, the layout is different to facilitate additional firefighters in the future, improve functionality of the facility and to provide a more open living area,” Fire and Rescue Services Chief Russell Sander said. “The exterior design is similar to the Sienna theme of the commercial development along Highway 6. The addition of the station will decrease response times in Sienna South by half, bringing it within national standards of five minutes and 20 seconds for the majority of the area.”

For more information about Missouri City, please visit the City website: http://www.missouricitytx.gov, like us on Facebook—fb/MissouriCityTX, watch Missouri City Television (Ch. 16 on Comcast and Ch. 99 on AT&T U-verse) and follow us on Twitter and Instagram—@MissouriCityTX.

Fort Bend County Still Among the Fastest-Growing Counties in the United States

29 04 2015

FBC mapThe primary purpose of this blog is to focus on emergency management.  Of course, we want to pay special attention to Fort Bend County and its efforts to provide a safe and secure environment for its citizens and businesses.  The Fort Bend County Office of Emergency Management coordinates disaster mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery activities to provide the safe environment noted above.  So, you might ask, why does this blog sometimes feature articles on economic development and population growth?  Because the construction of more housing, the locating of more businesses, and the arrival of new families has a direct effect on emergency management activities in the County.

Our County is now the 10th largest county in Texas having experienced a 57% rate in growth over the last decade. The efforts of our elected officials and the business community in Fort Bend County have caused this expansion which has created more jobs, more tax dollars, and dynamic business centers to create opportunity and diversity like no other place in Texas. Day in and day out, our population of almost 700,00 enjoys a fantastic environment for working and going to school and playing in a County which is the envy of most others, not only in the State of Texas, but in the nation.

On March 26, 2015, The Texas Tribune published an article about the growth of Texas’ population and the clear trend that the suburbs in metropolitan areas are demonstrating the quickest growth.  The article was written by Alexa Ura.  The reporter indicates that three of the State’s counties ranked among the fastest-growing areas in the United States based on recently released demographic information released by the United States Census Bureau.  Ura writes that “Fort Bend County, home to about 652,000 people in 2013, grew by 4.7 percent and ranked as the sixth-fastest-growing county. Southwest of Houston, Fort Bend has been called the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. because its population comes the closest to having an equal division of the nation’s four major ethnic communities — Asian, black, Hispanic and white. The county comprises several Houston suburbs, including Sugar Land and Richmond.”  Additionally, Lloyd Potter, the State of Texas demographer estimates that “Fort Bend County would eventually outgrow the suburb label given the rate of its population increase.”

However, this creates a challenge—— to paraphrase from familiar scripture—– “though we are blessed in Fort Bend County, much is required to make sure that our beautiful landscapes, historic landmarks, and stable community is not devastated by natural or man-made threats.”  Fort Bend County, through the leadership of County Judge Bob Hebert and the Commissioners Court, recognizes the need to improve the quality of life in our County through economic development, but also the charge to, not only protect the safety of our citizens, but also to instill confidence that Fort Bend citizens can go about raising families, conducting business and living their lives without abnormal fears from those who wish us harm, or the unpredictability of natural disasters.



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